FAQ

HOW OFTEN SHOULD I GO TO THE DENTIST?

For most patients, we recommend you have a check-up every six months. Regular dental checks will help us detect any early decay or gum disease. This means that in the long run you shouldn't have any nasty surprises!  

  

HOW MUCH WILL A DENTAL APPOINTMENT COST ME?

Call us today for an initial consultation or full oral examination quote over the phone. We are unable to quote for most restorative dental work without first looking in your mouth. A full detailed quote and treatment plan for any work required will be given to you to take away at your initial consultation. HICAPS is also available, so that your health fund rebate is processed on the spot. 

  

HOW MUCH WILL I GET BACK FROM MY HEALTH FUND ?

This will depend on your particular Health Fund and level of cover. Once you have recieved your quote (including item numbers) you can check your rebate details with your fund prior to your appointment. 

  

HOW OFTEN SHOULD I BRUSH & FLOSS MY TEETH?

Plaque begins to build up shortly after you eat, however it would be out of the question for most of us to brush every time we ate! We recommend you brush with a soft toothbrush or quality electric toothbrush twice per day, morning and at night. Tooth brushing alone can not reach all of the surfaces of your teeth. In fact, it is the area between the teeth that often decays first due to the difficulty of access. Flossing once per day will not only clean the plaque off the enamel surfaces of your teeth to help prevent decay, it will also help ensure the health of your gums and prevent gum disease.

Most people find it difficult to floss when they begin. Ask us for advice and a flossing demonstration at your next check up. With practice, you will be flossing with ease in no time at all!

  

WHAT IS GUM DISEASE?

Gum disease is inflammation of the gums and damage to the bone that anchors teeth in the jaws. Gum disease is very common, affecting more than half of adults with natural teeth.  

If plaque isn't cleaned off your teeth regularly, your gums will become red, swollen and shiny, and they may bleed. This is the early stage of gum disease, called gingivitis. Gingivitis is completely reversible. If the plaque is removed, the gums will recover.

If gingivitis is not treated, the gums may begin to pull away from your teeth, leaving a little pocket around each tooth. These pockets trap plaque that you can't reach with a toothbrush. Over time, plaque hardens to become tartar (calculus).

The irritation gradually spreads to the bone structures around your teeth. As time goes on, the pockets get deeper and more difficult to clean, and the gum and bone may shrink. This is called periodontitis. The shrinking gums may expose some of the roots of your teeth, making them wobbly and sensitive. If left untreated over a number of years, your teeth may fall out, or need to be taken out by a dentist.  

  

CAN MY DIET EFFECT MY ORAL HEALTH?

Eating sugary food and drink encourages tooth decay. But it's how often these sugars are eaten - rather than the amount - that is important. Avoiding sugars between meals gives your teeth a chance to be re-mineralised by saliva. Limiting sugar between mealtimes is particularly important for children. It's also good for your general health to reduce your sugar intake. These days there are many hidden sugars in convenience food. If you are unsure what foods you or your children should be avoiding, ask the dentist at your next visit. 

  

CAN I FEEL DECAY? 

Enamel doesn't contain any nerves so you won't feel any pain at first. Eventually a cavity may reach the dentine - the yellowish substance underneath the enamel that forms the bulk of a tooth. Dentine is sensitive to pain so more advanced cavities may be sensitive, especially when eating or drinking anything hot, sugary or acidic. This is why we strongly recommend regular dental checks, to ensure no decay lesions have progressed through the enamel.

  

X-RAYS; WHY DO I NEED THEM?

Depending on your decay rate, we recommend that diagnostic xrays of your teeth are taken every 12-18 months. Many diseases, lesions and conditions can only be detected with the use of dental radiographs. It is impossible to see directly between the teeth or under the gums or bone without the use of a dental radiograph. Many times the patient has no signs or symptoms of disease. Without the use of dental radiographs, the dentist is limited to detect only the disease that is visible in the mouth. Dental x-rays can detect disease much sooner than the clinical examination alone. This enables the dental practitioner to identify problems early so that pain and extensive, costly treatment can be avoided.  

 

 

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